History & Preservation @UW

Do you have a project at UW addressing History & Preservation and cities, urbanism or the Seattle metropolitan region? If so we want to feature your work. Email us at urbanuw@uw.edu with the following information:   project title, brief description, link, image and relevant tags

Center for the Study of the Pacific Northwest's website

Center for the Study of the Pacific Northwest

The Center for the Study of the Pacific Northwest is dedicated to advancing scholarship on the Pacific Northwest, and the North American West more generally, with an emphasis on historical research. Located in the Department of History at the University of Washington, we support research, teaching, and public programs that promote and disseminate knowledge on the peoples and issues that...

Learn more on theCenter for the Study of the Pacific Northwest website

Center for Studies in Demography and Ecology (CSDE)'s website

Center for Studies in Demography and Ecology (CSDE)

The Center for Studies in Demography and Ecology (CSDE) supports population research and training at the University of Washington. It also functions as a regional center that gives population scientists at affiliated institutions in the Pacific Northwest access to cutting-edge demographic infrastructure and services. The core of CSDE consists of a large group of productive population scholars, with disciplinary homes...

Learn more on theCenter for Studies in Demography and Ecology (CSDE) website

The Cities Collaboratory's website

The Cities Collaboratory

The Cities Collaboratory is a transdisciplinary research and teaching laboratory for the study of multiple dimensions of cities and urban processes. Based at the University of Washington, the Cities Collab seeks to challenge the way that cities are understood and reimagined as they meet twenty-first century challenges. Cities have long served as sites and agents of economic expansion, social innovation,...

Learn more on theThe Cities Collaboratory website

Interdisciplinary Urban Design & Planning (PhD)'s website

Interdisciplinary Urban Design & Planning (PhD)

This program brings together faculty from disciplines ranging from Architecture to Sociology to focus on the interdisciplinary study of urban problems and interventions. Covering scales from neighborhoods to metropolitan areas, the program addresses interrelationships between the physical environment, the built environment, and the social, economic, and political institutions and processes that shape urban areas. The breadth of this program permits...

Learn more on theInterdisciplinary Urban Design & Planning (PhD) website

Education, Equity, & Society (ESS)'s website

Education, Equity, & Society (ESS)

Education, Equity, & Society is an intellectual community within the College of Education that encourages students to explore the meaning, purpose, and significance of education in diverse community contexts with the aim of contributing to local and global educational equity and social change. We are an interdisciplinary group that draws on expertise in several traditions and cultural contexts, including history,...

Learn more on theEducation, Equity, & Society (ESS) website

Lake Union Lab's website

Lake Union Lab

Lake Union Laboratory (LULab) is a collaboratory research project created to explore the overlapping and interdependent social, environmental, economic and technological dynamics of the city, specifically the Lake Union area of Seattle, Washington. This project serves as a means to investigate how multi-disciplinary and transdisciplinary models of research can build on the foundations of explorations in the historical, the spatial,...

Learn more on theLake Union Lab website

Name Affiliations Areas of Interest
Daniel Abramson
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Luther Adams
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Alex Anderson
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Nancy Beadie
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Rachel Berney
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Michael Brown
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Manish Chalana
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Meredith Clausen
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Jerry V. Finrow
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James Gregory
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Stevan Harrell
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Nicole Huber
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Susan P. Kemp
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Brian McLaren
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LInda Nash
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Margaret O’Mara
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Jeffrey Karl Ochsner
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Ken Tadashi Oshima
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Cynthia Pearson
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Vikram Prakash
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Andrew Prindle
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Kerstin Rowell
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Jill Sterrett
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JamesTweedie
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Edwina Uehara
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John Vallier
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Thaisa Way
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Lizabeth (Betsy) Wilson
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Research Center Focus Mission
Urban Theory Lab
Harvard University
In the early 1970s, Henri Lefebvre put forward the radical hypothesis of the complete urbanization of society. This required, in his view, a radical shift from the analysis of urban form to the investigation of urbanization processes. The Urban Theory Lab builds upon Lefebvre’s approach to investigate emergent sociospatial formations under early twenty-first century capitalism. Our research starts from the proposition that inherited frameworks of urban knowledge must be radically reinvented to illuminate emergent forms of twenty-first century urbanization. In contrast to the urban/suburban/rural distinction that has long underpinned the major traditions of urban research, data collection and cartographic practice, we argue that the urban today represents a worldwide condition in which all political-economic and socio-environmental relations are enmeshed, regardless of terrestrial location or morphological configuration. This emergent condition of planetary urbanization means, paradoxically, that even spaces that lie well beyond the traditional centers of agglomeration—from worldwide shipping lanes, transportation networks and communications infrastructures to resource extraction sites, alpine and coastal tourist enclaves, offshore financial centers, agro-industrial catchment zones, and erstwhile “natural” spaces such as the world’s oceans, deserts, jungles, mountain ranges, tundra and atmosphere—are becoming integral to a worldwide operational landscape for (capitalist) urbanization processes.
Center for Cultural Landscapes
University of Virginia
The Center for Cultural Landscapes produces research and creates new models of innovative cultural landscape stewardship in the region, the nation and around the globe. We are an interdisciplinary group of anthropologists, historians, landscape architects, architects, and planners who are connected to, and collaborating with, a larger group of associated professionals and organizations to achieve this mission. Our work focuses on increasing awareness of the historical and ecological value of cultural landscapes through innovative scholarly research, site documentation and fieldwork, planning, preservation, management and design. The Center for Cultural Landscapes is funded by the UVA Sara Shallenberger Brown Cultural Landscapes Initiative, UVA Associate Provost for the Arts, and the UVA School of Architecture Dean's office.
Aga Khan Program
Harvard University
The Aga Khan Program at the Harvard Graduate School of Design is part of the Aga Khan Program for Islamic Architecture at Harvard and MIT, dedicated to the study of Islamic art and architecture, urbanism, landscape design and conservation. The GSD program is invested in the application of that knowledge to contemporary design issues. Established in 2003, the Aga Khan Program at the GSD provides tuition and scholarships to doctoral and PhD students studying the impact of development in the shaping of landscapes, cities and regional territories in the Muslim world. The program’s research and activities focus a lens on the design of public spaces, environmental concerns and land use and territorial settlement patterns from World War II to the present. Any full-time student already enrolled at Harvard or MIT can benefit from the course offerings and research undertakings of the Aga Khan Program at the GSD.
MIT CoLab
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
The Community Innovators Lab (CoLab) is a center for planning and development within the MIT Department of Urban Studies and Planning (DUSP). CoLab supports the development and use of knowledge from excluded communities to deepen civic engagement, improve community practice, inform policy, mobilize community assets, and generate shared wealth. We believe that community knowledge can drive powerful innovation and can help make markets an arena for supporting social justice. CoLab facilitates the interchange of knowledge and resources between MIT and community organizations. We engage students to be practitioners of this approach to community change and sustainability.
UCL Urban Laboratory
University College London
The UCL Urban Laboratory, established in 2005, is a university wide initiative that brings together the best urban teaching and research at UCL. Our activities build on the full spectrum of work across the arts and sciences, ranging from civil engineering to film studies, from urban history to the latest developments in architectural design. At the UCL Urban Laboratory we encourage urban thinking, research, teaching and practice that are critical, creative, independent and interdisciplinary. We aim to share the knowledge our work produces widely, with diverse audiences. We experiment with new methods of urban research across disciplinary boundaries, practices and professions, providing a laboratory for cross- and interdisciplinary invention, because difficult urban challenges demand new modes of collaboration.
African Centre for Cities
University of Cape Town
The African Centre for Cities (ACC) is an interdisciplinary research and teaching programme focused on quality scholarship regarding the dynamics of unsustainable urbanisation processes in Africa, with an eye on identifying systemic responses. Rapid and poorly governed urbanization in Africa points to a profound developmental and philosophical crisis. Most scholarship focuses on the development challenges but continue to fail to provide adequate answers or proposal to reverse growing urban inequality, environmental degradation and social conflicts. In this context it is unsurprising that there are very few qualified and appropriately trained urban professionals and activists who can manage Africa’s cities and towns. The ACC seeks to intervene into this situation by remaining rooted in context and building knowledge networks between durable research institutions across the Continent. The ACC conducts a series of applied research programmes in Cape Town, South Africa and significant parts of Africa.
Center for Metropolitan Studies
Technical University of Berlin
The city is our research field. Since 2004 the Center for Metropolitan Studies (CMS) at the Technische Universität Berlin has brought together both young and experienced researchers to study the historical developments and current problems of the metropolis in its international graduate research program, the masters program in historical urban studies, and adjunct research projects. The research center and its programs are interdisciplinary and international. The Center currently focuses on the topics of metropolis and mobility, suburbanization and urban renewal, cultural economies and cultural innovation processes. We view current problems such as security in cities, segregation and polarization from a historical perspective to uncover possible solutions for the present. Historical analysis sharpens our view of the twenty-first-century metropolis. The Center for Metropolitan Studies looks to bring together academic scholarship and practical research and consulting, to promote younger scholars and to encourage cooperation and communication between various actors in scientific research, economics, politics and civil society. CMS draws upon the experience of the thirty-year-old, internationally acknowledged Research Unit for Urban History of the Technische Universität in Berlin.
Urban Worlds
Durham University
Urban Worlds is a research cluster that was formed in 2009 to reflect the department’s international standing in cutting-edge urban research. Its purpose is to provide a forum that brings together existing urban research within the department and to generate new lines of inquiry. The urban geographical research in the department aims to understand the emerging ways in which urban worlds are produced, governed, contested and transformed. We are interested in what is 'new' about contemporary urbanism, including the techniques through which cities are governed, the domains through which urban life is lived and reformulated, and the prospects of different forms of urban justice and democracy. A key question for us is how to conceptualise and research the changing relations between urbanism and space, whether through the making and maintaining of existing and new technosocial and ecological infrastructures, the production and contestation of shifting political economic architectures, the everyday life of neighbourhood and street politics, or the politics of urban encounters and informalities. We ask how we might understand urban spatialities as relational - and post-relational - and seek to excavate the different ways in which we might think of the world as becoming urban. How, for instance, does thinking the 'urban' and the 'world' change as the world becomes urbanised and the urban worldwide? We reject the epistemic and institutional separation of urbanism into global North and global South, and instead ask how a diversity of urban experiences and theoretical histories might pluralise the ways in which we understand and research urban worlds.