Black life is draining out of Seattle, census shows

Black life is draining out of Seattle, census shows

Tim Thomas

​South King County has long been a place where people with modest incomes could find a home. Now more people are coming, driven by high rents in Seattle. And a University of Washington School of Sociology researcher has found that African-Americans are among the most affected by this wave of displacement. Tim Thomas of the University of Washington discovered the trend while digging deep into Census data. “There’s this massive shift...

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Honoring Women Collaborators at Urban@UW

Honoring Women Collaborators at Urban@UW

credit: Jessica Hamilton

In honor of International Women’s Day, we are highlighting just some of UW’s brilliant female professors, scholars, and and change-makers with whom Urban@UW is proud to collaborate. Click on their names to explore their work.

Leadership:

Thaisa Way, Executive Director, Urban@UW; Department of Landscape Architecture

Executive Committee:

Margaret O’Mara, Department of History

Susan P. Kemp, School of Social Work<...

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Julian Agyeman: A Brief Reading List

Julian Agyeman: A Brief Reading List

Urban@UW and Julian Agyeman

Julian Agyeman, Professor of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning at Tufts University, will be delivering a talk at the University of Washington on February 28 at 7:30pm. Agyeman was originally trained as an ecologist and biogeographer before turning to critical urban studies and environmental social science. Agyeman’s scholarship challenges basic notions of sustainability through his concept of ‘just sustainabilities,’ which aims to enhance equity and justice for both humans and ecosystems, now...

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Reflections on Urban Environmental Justice in a Time of Climate Change

Reflections on Urban Environmental Justice in a Time of Climate Change

​Photo by: David de la Cruz

​On November 7th and 8th Urban@UW, in collaboration with the University of Washington’s Climate Impacts Group (CIG), hosted a symposium to begin transdisciplinary conversation on the multifaceted dynamics and consequences of Urban Environmental Justice in a Time of Climate Change (UEJ). Below are some reflections from this event, and a sample of the resources we’ll be sharing from our time together.

Urban environmental justice has been impacting cities...

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First Livable City Year projects underway; kickoff event Oct. 6

First Livable City Year projects underway; kickoff event Oct. 6

Jen Davison, Urban@UW, University of Washington

Not even a week has passed since the start of the quarter, and already a group of University of Washington public health students is deep into discovering the cultural flavor and identity of each neighborhood in a nearby city.

The project is a sizeable challenge: Students will pour over census and public health data, interview residents, photograph neighborhoods and summarize their findings in a report. The end result will help officials in...

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Data Science for Social Good 2016

Data Science for Social Good 2016

This summer we are thrilled to be supporting the eScience Institute’s Data Science for Social Good (DSSG) program.

Modeled after similar programs at the University of Chicago and Georgia Tech, with elements from eScience’s own Data Science Incubator, sixteen DSSG Student Fellows have been working with academic researchers, data scientists, and public stakeholder groups on data-intensive research projects. This year’s projects specifically focus on Urban Science, aiming to understand...

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Get Out of Jail Now, Now Pay Up: Your Fines are Waiting

Get Out of Jail Now, Now Pay Up: Your Fines are Waiting

Wikimedia Commons & Bob Jagendorf

When you’re convicted of a crime in America, it’s not just prison time you may face—there are fines, fees, and other cash penalties, too. And when you get out, they’ll be waiting. Plus interest.

The plight of “Kathie” symbolizes everything that’s wrong with this system, one that heaps a debt burden onto ex-convicts who don’t have the means to pay. Kathie (a pseudonym) was a 4...

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Seattle’s ‘Diverse’ Neighborhoods Are Surprisingly Segregated

Seattle’s ‘Diverse’ Neighborhoods Are Surprisingly Segregated

Tim Thomas and KUOW

Seattleites know they live in a racially segregated city.

White people live north; black people and Asians live south.

But there are a handful of neighborhoods that have become increasingly integrated in recent years – namely, Columbia City and the Central District.

But University of Washington sociology doctoral students found that those neighborhoods may not be so diverse when you analyze the area block by block. Tim Thomas,...

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Reading List for Dr. Mario Small’s Visit 2/25

Reading List for Dr. Mario Small’s Visit 2/25

In anticipation of next week’s lecture with Harvard’s Dr. Mario Luis Small we thought you might enjoy a few readings to get a feel for what exactly he is all about.

No Two Ghettos Are Alike - This short piece by Dr. Small shares it’s name with Thursday’s lecture, and explores some of the complex challenges facing theory and urban scholarship. http://scholar.harvard.edu/files/mariosmall...

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UW project focuses on fines and fees that create ‘prisoners of debt’

UW project focuses on fines and fees that create ‘prisoners of debt’

Criminals are meant to pay their debts to society through sentencing, but a different type of court-imposed debt can tie them to the criminal justice system for life and impact their ability to move forward with their lives.

Though debtors’ prisons were eliminated in the United States almost two centuries ago, a modern-day version exists in the dizzyingly complex system of fines and fees levied against people as they move through the...

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