City of Bellevue selected as 2018-2019 UW Livable City Year partner

City of Bellevue selected as 2018-2019 UW Livable City Year partner

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The University of Washington Livable City Year program has selected the City of Bellevue to be the community partner for the 2018-2019 academic year.

The year-long partnership connects city staff with students and faculty who will collaborate on projects to advance the Bellevue City Council Vision Priorities, specifically around livability and sustainability.

In the upcoming year, city staff will work with University of Washington’s Livable City Year program participants...

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How social networks help perpetuate the ‘cycle of segregation’

How social networks help perpetuate the ‘cycle of segregation’

Pixabay: CC0 creative commons: Publicco

Think about the last time you looked for a new apartment or house. Maybe you asked your friends or colleagues about where they lived. You thought about your route to work, or that neighborhood you always drive through on your way to your kid’s soccer practice. Many of these places were familiar to you, whether from an occasional visit or part of a daily routine. And if you’re like most people, you...

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Cities, scientists unite in battle against climate change at U.N. summit

Cities, scientists unite in battle against climate change at U.N. summit

Pixabay: CC 0 Creative Commons : Thommas68

Climate scientists and city planners are to start charting a global roadmap on how cities can best battle climate change, when they gather at a U.N.-backed summit in Canada’s Edmonton on Monday. The three day gathering marks the first time cities rather than nations are offered a seat at the table of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the U.N.’s top scientific authority on global warming, organizers...

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Cascadia showcases how a coordinated corridor strategy can reinforce urban innovation

Cascadia showcases how a coordinated corridor strategy can reinforce urban innovation

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A central premise of Meeting of the Minds is that the flexibility, practicality, and focus of municipal governments make them ideal technological and social innovators. But can the ingenuity of U.S. cities be sufficiently amplified to effectively keep up with the pace of climate change, especially in the face of declining federal leadership?

Answering this question requires us to find the most effective scales for replicating urban progress. Metropolitan to regional...

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Shocker: It’s mostly men moving to Seattle for tech jobs

Shocker: It’s mostly men moving to Seattle for tech jobs

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For every four men who moved to Seattle for a tech job in the last decade, only one woman did, too, according to a recent analysis that looked at the trend of tech transplants nationwide.To industry experts and academics, the findings from the careers website Paysa.com came as no surprise. The data is more of the same — evidence of a gender void in the technology sector that has been well-documented but...

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May HQ2 be ever in your favor: Amazon’s new short list pits 20 cities against each other

May HQ2 be ever in your favor: Amazon’s new short list pits 20 cities against each other

​Flickr: Peterhess: CC BY 2.0

Amazon’s decision to establish a second and equal corporate headquarters outside of Seattle made the company an object of desire and scorn simultaneously, as cities were suddenly pitted against one another for the $5 billion prize.

And while the 20 candidates that made Amazon’s HQ2 short list last Thursday are likely celebrating, the decision to publicly narrow the field isn’t going to assuage any concerns that Amazon is staging its own...

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Cities face a surge in online deliveries

Cities face a surge in online deliveries

​CC BY-ND 2.0: Flickr: torbakhopper

By the time veteran UPS driver Thomas “Tommy” Chu leaves work, he will have picked up and delivered hundreds of packages in New York City, making some 16 stops an hour as his company hurries to meet the online shopping rush. But what may be his most impressive feat of the day precedes that scramble: at precisely 10:02 am, Mr Chu snags a parking spot. This is no small victory in midtown Manhattan, where one...

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Urban@UW compiles Faculty Highlights Report for research, teaching and engagement on homelessness

Urban@UW compiles Faculty Highlights Report for research, teaching and engagement on homelessness

As part of its recently launched Homelessess Research Initiative, Urban@UW has collaborated with faculty and staff across all three UW campuses to compile a broad-ranging selection of powerful and robust projects addressing homelessness from a research lens. Check out the Faculty Highlights Report to learn more about these efforts and the people behind them.

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In Seattle, cost of meeting basic needs up $30,000 in a decade

In Seattle, cost of meeting basic needs up $30,000 in a decade

Wikimedia commons: Perry-Castañeda Library Map Collection: Public Domain

A Seattle family of four must bring in $75,000 annually to pay for basic housing, food, transportation and health and child care – an increase of 62 percent since 2006, based on a new report from the University of Washington.

The city’s escalating cost of living may not be a surprise. But across the state, the amount of money required to make ends meet for two adults, a preschooler and a school-age child has...

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UW researchers analyze effects of minimum wage on seattle food prices

UW researchers analyze effects of minimum wage on seattle food prices

CC A- SA 3.0 Photo Copyright © Jack Gavigan 2009 Wikimedia commons

Affiliates UW Assistant Professor of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences and Adjunct Assistant Professor in Health Services Jennifer Otten (lead author), UW Professor at the Evans School of Public Policy and Governance Jake Vigdor, and Evans School’s Associate Dean for Research and Professor of Public policy and Governance and Adjunct Professor of Economics Mark Long recently published a paper titled “The Impact of a City-Level Minimum-Wage Policy on Supermarket Food Prices in...

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Microsoft backs Seattle-Vancouver high-speed rail study as Cascadia conference aims to deepen ties

Microsoft backs Seattle-Vancouver high-speed rail study as Cascadia conference aims to deepen ties

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Pacific Northwest business and political leaders on both sides of the Canada-US border announced a series of agreements to strengthen relationships between Seattle, Portland, Vancouver B.C. and the surrounding areas.

The new partnerships, made ahead of the second Cascadia Innovation Corridor conference in Seattle this week, focus on technology, economic development, education and transportation. Government officials, universities, companies and research institutions are participating in the effort, which is meant to bring...

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College of Built Environments’ David de la Cruz partners with communities for environmental justice

College of Built Environments’ David de la Cruz partners with communities for environmental justice

David de la Cruz

David de la Cruz has a question about power. “When we think about toxic sites and where they’re placed in relation to where people live, who’s left out of making those decisions?” “Often,” he answers, “it’s the people who live there. It’s low-income communities, working-class communities and communities of color who don’t have a say. They’re the ones who have to deal with...

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Urban Scholar Highlight: Scott Allard

Urban Scholar Highlight: Scott Allard

Scott W. Allard is a Professor of Public Affairs at the Evans School of Public Policy and Governance. Allard is also on the executive committee of the West Coast Poverty Center and Urban@UW, and an affiliate of the Center for Studies in Demography and Ecology. We sat down with him to discuss his work at the UW and beyond.

How do your current research interests intersect with...

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Why Seattle is poised to be a leader in ‘smart city’ technology and regulations

New technology is helping local government create “smarter” cities in a variety of ways, from adaptive traffic lights to open data platforms to advanced utility meters. But with innovation comes complication. Privacy, security, and equality challenges are inevitable when the public sector tries to implement technology with the help of private companies.

This was the subject of a roundtable discussion hosted by U.S. Rep. Suzan DelBene (D-WA) at the University...

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Does commercial zoning increase neighborhood crime?

Does commercial zoning increase neighborhood crime?

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In the run-up to the 2016 presidential campaign, Donald Trump told The New York Times that America’s urban centers are some of the “most dangerous,” crime-filled places in the world. Even though experts were quick to point out that violent crime has actually declined in all but a handful of America’s largest cities and urban areas, the view of cities as dense, dirty, and dangerous and suburbs as spread out, pastoral,...

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