Urban Scholar Highlight: Josephine Ensign

Urban Scholar Highlight: Josephine Ensign

Josephine Ensign is a Professor in University of Washington’s School of Nursing and Adjunct Professor in the Department of Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies, Affiliate Faculty in UW’s Certificate Program in Public Scholarship, and coordinator of Urban@UW’s Homelessness Research Initiative’s Doorway Project—which is hosting a popup cafe in honor of Earth Day on April 22! We sat down with her to discuss her work and research on homelessness at...

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Giving Voice, Being Seen: Community Agency and Design Action in a Time of Climate Change, April 26

Giving Voice, Being Seen: Community Agency and Design Action in a Time of Climate Change, April 26

Climate change affects everyone, but it does not impact all communities equally. These differences may be most evident in the built environment and the shared spaces such as parks, streets, schools, homes, which we experience and move through daily.

In seeking to inspire more collaborative, inclusive and creative responses to climate change in the built environment, the interdisciplinary PhD in the Built Environment at UW is organizing a one-day symposium around the...

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How social networks help perpetuate the ‘cycle of segregation’

How social networks help perpetuate the ‘cycle of segregation’

Pixabay: CC0 creative commons: Publicco

Think about the last time you looked for a new apartment or house. Maybe you asked your friends or colleagues about where they lived. You thought about your route to work, or that neighborhood you always drive through on your way to your kid’s soccer practice. Many of these places were familiar to you, whether from an occasional visit or part of a daily routine. And if you’re like most people, you...

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A Homeless Camp in Our Back Yard? Please, a University Says

A Homeless Camp in Our Back Yard? Please, a University Says

​Pixabay: CC0 creative commons: Bruce Emmerling

For months, 65 homeless people lived in tents they set up in a parking lot behind the Seattle Pacific University bookstore, with a row of portable toilets and layers of clothes to guard against the damp chill of winter. It was a homeless camp like so many that crop up along roads and ramshackle lots in some American cities, except that this one had been invited here by the university administration.

So Genny...

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Many homeless people take better care of their pets than themselves; this clinic helps them

Many homeless people take better care of their pets than themselves; this clinic helps them

Pixabay: CC0 Creative commons: Leroy Skalstad

Homeless people with pets are usually criticized and sometimes turned away from shelters. But that’s starting to change.

His name is Bud the Amazing Wonder Dog, but the huge German shepherd-rottweiler mix was not feeling amazing or wonderful during his clinic visit, as he whimpered and tried to steady himself on an examination table too small for a dog his size. His owner, a homeless man named Stan, wrapped his arms...

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Tri-campus survey aims to identify student struggles with housing, food costs

Tri-campus survey aims to identify student struggles with housing, food costs

In a region as expensive as the Puget Sound, making ends meet affects college students, too. Rent, utilities and food can run into the hundreds, if not thousands, of dollars a month – and for students without the means, it’s a daunting and sometimes compromising challenge.

Urban@UW is trying to learn more about the situations facing students. From now through March 16, a survey is available for students ages 18 or older...

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What would a truly disabled-accessible city look like?

What would a truly disabled-accessible city look like?

​Labeled for reuse

To David Meere, a visually impaired man from Melbourne, among the various obstacles to life in cities is another that is less frequently discussed: fear. “The fear of not being able to navigate busy, cluttered and visually oriented environments is a major barrier to participation in normal life,” says Meere, 52, “be that going to the shops, going for a walk in the park, going to work, looking for work, or simply...

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Climate change and equity - A community conversation

Climate change and equity - A community conversation

CIG

Join UW Department of Environmental & Occupational Health Sciences, Front and Centered, the Climate Impacts Group, Urban@UW, and UW School of Public Health for an evening discussion about climate change and equity in Washington State on February 21st, 2018 at 5:30 PM.

Front and Centered, Urban@UW, the Climate Impacts Group and the UW School of Public Health & Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences are working on two climate and environmental justice research...

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The Doorway project’s second pop-up cafe

The Doorway project’s second pop-up cafe

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Save The Date: The Doorway Project’s second pop-up cafe will be open on Sunday February 25, from 2:00pm-4:00pm at the University Heights Center, 5031 University Way NE, Seattle, WA 98105. Everyone is welcome to attend this free, family-friendly event to listen to live music, enjoy warm beverages and food. No one will be turned away for lack of funds. Learn about some of the efforts to end youth homelessness in the...

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Urban Scholar Highlight: Rachel Fyall

Urban Scholar Highlight: Rachel Fyall

Rachel Fyall is an Assistant Professor in the Evans School of Public Policy and Governance, and the Faculty Chair of Urban@UW’s Homelessness Research Initiative. We sat down with her last quarter to discuss her work.

What you do at the UW and what led you to your current research interests?

The main thing I study and teach about is the role and interaction of nonprofits with...

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Shocker: It’s mostly men moving to Seattle for tech jobs

Shocker: It’s mostly men moving to Seattle for tech jobs

Wikimedia Commons:

Public Domain

For every four men who moved to Seattle for a tech job in the last decade, only one woman did, too, according to a recent analysis that looked at the trend of tech transplants nationwide.To industry experts and academics, the findings from the careers website Paysa.com came as no surprise. The data is more of the same — evidence of a gender void in the technology sector that has been well-documented but...

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New book ‘City Unsilenced’ explores protest and public space

Jeff Hou is a professor of landscape architecture and adjunct professor of urban design and planning in the University of Washington’s College of Built Environments. His research, teaching and practice focus on community design, design activism, cross-cultural learning and engaging marginalized communities in planning and design.

Hou has written extensively on the agency of citizens and communities in shaping built environments. His newest book is “City Unsilenced: Urban Resistance and...

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Skid Road: The intersection of health and homelessness

Skid Road: The intersection of health and homelessness

After years of caring for the homeless in the streets and dilapidated motels of Richmond, Virginia, nurse Josephine Ensign became homeless herself.

Many of her patients were prostitutes—some as young as 15—and her conscience no longer allowed her to adhere to her clinic’s policies. Though she was Christian, she was fired for referring many of these women for abortions, for not making AIDS patients “account for their sins”...

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UW’s Doorway Project kicks off services for homeless youth

UW’s Doorway Project kicks off services for homeless youth

​CC BY-ND 2.0: Flickr: Irene Bonacchi

The University District community includes as much as one-third of King County’s homeless youth over any given year. It’s a neighborhood where a food bank and youth shelter are available, and where young people on the streets can blend in.

Now the University of Washington, in a partnership among Urban@UW, faculty, students and community service agencies – and with $1 million in state funding over two years –...

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Can Seattle rezone away the racial divide in housing?

Can Seattle rezone away the racial divide in housing?

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For generations, Seattle was segregated through racist neighborhood covenants, deed restrictions, even banking policies designed to keep certain minorities out of largely white enclaves.Yet nearly 50 years after the landmark Fair Housing Act sought to reverse that legacy, the city remains strikingly separated along color lines.

A Seattle Times analysis shows that areas dedicated to single-family houses remain the city’s most exclusive havens. If you live in North Capitol Hill or...

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