New route-finding map lets Seattle pedestrians avoid hills, construction, accessibility barriers

New route-finding map lets Seattle pedestrians avoid hills, construction, accessibility barriers

​CC 3.0 by T413 on Wikimedia

Transportation routing services primarily designed for people in cars don’t give pedestrians, parents pushing bulky strollers or people in wheelchairs much information about how to easily navigate a neighborhood using sidewalks.

On Wednesday AccessMap – a University of Washington project spearheaded by the Taskar Center for Accessible Technology — launched a new online travel planner offering customizable suggestions for people who need accessible or pedestrian-friendly routes when getting from point A...

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Livable City Year releases RFP, invites cities to partner for 2017-8 academic year

Livable City Year releases RFP, invites cities to partner for 2017-8 academic year

The University of Washington’s Livable City Year initiative is now accepting proposals from cities, counties, special districts and regional partnerships to partner with during the 2017-2018 academic year.

UW Livable City Year (UW LCY) connects University of Washington faculty and students with a municipal partner for a full academic year to work on projects fostering livability. The municipal partner will identify a selection of projects in their community that could be...

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Cars vs health: UW’s Moudon, Dannenberg contribute to Lancet series on urban planning, public health

Cars vs health: UW’s Moudon, Dannenberg contribute to Lancet series on urban planning, public health

WikiMedia Commons and Minesweeper

Automobiles — and the planning and infrastructure to support them — are making our cities sick, says an international group of researchers now publishing a three-part series in the British medical journal The Lancet.

University of Washington professors Anne Vernez Moudon and Andrew Dannenberg are co-authors of the first of this series that explores these connections and suggests several planning alternatives for better health.

The Lancet published the series on...

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PARK(ing) Day+ and Little Collective’s “Bees and Salmon”

PARK(ing) Day+ and Little Collective’s “Bees and Salmon”

Little Collective

Today you may notice some new public spaces in your neighborhood; but look fast, because they will be gone by Sunday. Now a global phenomenon, PARK(ing) day is a few hours per year when cities endeavor to convert city spaces into public places called parklets. The parklet’s origins are tied to ReBar, a San Francisco based studio, that converted a single parking space into a micro park. This first parklet lived for...

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Exploring Artistically Significant Landscapes

Exploring Artistically Significant Landscapes

Wikimedia Commons and Jim Henderson

Associate Professor of Landscape Architecture Thaisa Way has been appointed chair of the Dumbarton Oaks Fellows in Garden and Landscape Studies. Way, who has been a Senior Fellow with Dumbarton Oaks since 2011 will serve a one year term.As one of six Senior Fellows, the group serves as advisors to the Director of Dumbarton Oaks in relation to the Garden and Landscape Studies Program.

As chair, Way will play a guiding role...

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New book ‘Cities that Think Like Planets’ imagines urban regions resilient to change

New book ‘Cities that Think Like Planets’ imagines urban regions resilient to change

Wikimedia Commons and Gindelis

Marina Alberti is a professor in the Department of Urban Design and Planning, which is part of the University of Washington College of Built Environments. Alberti directs the college’s Urban Ecology Research Laboratory and the Graduate School’s interdisciplinary doctoral program in urban design and planning.

She answered some questions about her new book, “Cities that Think Like Planets: Complexity, Resilience, and Innovation in Hybrid Ecosystems,” which was published...

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Jeff Shulman and the Seattle Growth Podcast: An Office Hours Visit

Jeff Shulman and the Seattle Growth Podcast: An Office Hours Visit

Jeff Shulman

Jeff Shulman moved to Seattle a decade ago to begin his career at the University of Washington. In that short time, he’s watched Seattle’s dramatic and ongoing growth transform the city. This former South Lake Union resident has put together a thirteen-episode, in-depth look at how Seattle’s changes have affected real people. With nearly 100 interviews done to create the series, Shulman is looking forward to the July 26th launch of the Seattle...

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New Tech Could Restore Some Quiet To Noisy Oceans

New Tech Could Restore Some Quiet To Noisy Oceans

Jill Fine & Wikimedia Commons

Forty feet below the surface of Puget Sound, a marbled murrelet dives for its catch. The water is cold, dark — and incredibly noisy. A ping-ping-ping emanates from the shore over second-long intervals and continues on for the next several hours, sending a series of pressure waves through the ocean. For the endangered bird, these sounds could result in anything from a disturbing annoyance to internal injuries or even death.

The pings...

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Unlikely Allies: Future of Cities Festival - Seattle, July 5-6th

Unlikely Allies: Future of Cities Festival - Seattle, July 5-6th

Impact Hub

July 5 - 6, 2016 – Seattle, WA, USA

What happens when you bring a diverse group of global and local citizens, innovators and entrepreneurs from 80+ cities around the world into a city, inspire them to scale and improve their solutions for city challenges and connect them to make these changes lasting and transferable to other cities across the globe?

Unlikely Allies is a two-day festival that takes place in one...

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Reading List for Edgar Pieterse Visit 4/12

Reading List for Edgar Pieterse Visit 4/12

Portrait Courtesy of African Centre for Cities

In anticipation of Edgar Pieterse’s visit we thought you might enjoy a video lecture and in-depth examination to get a feel for Pieterse’s research and thinking.

How can we transcend slum urbanism in Africa? – Edgar Pieterse, University of Cape Town - This short video delivered by Edgar Pieterse and UN-Habitat offers a very accessible overview of African urbanism and places these ideas in the context of...

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Making Disruption a Force for Good - A letter from President Ana Mari Cauce

Making Disruption a Force for Good - A letter from President Ana Mari Cauce

We hear a lot about “disruption” these days as businesses and institutions—and universities are no exception—are faced with the prospect of an upstart coming along and disrupting a portion of, or their entire, enterprise or industry. Disruption is often seen as a side effect of innovation, particularly in technology. Each of us carries an example of a disruptive technology with us every day in the form of our cellphones. I wrote...

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Heterogeneity and American Ghettos with Dr. Mario Luis Small - 2/25

Heterogeneity and American Ghettos with Dr. Mario Luis Small - 2/25

February 25th / 6:00-7:30pm / CMU 120

Dr. Mario Luis Small Grafstein Family Professor, Harvard University

By the end of the 20th century, the dominant theories of urban poverty argued that U.S. ghettos had become isolated areas devoid of everyday institutions and disconnected from mainstream society. Dr. Small examines whether the conventional models have underestimated the extent of heterogeneity across U.S. ghettos and its consequences for...

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2016 Urban Studies Forum: Alternative Visions of Livability Choices, Costs and Consequences

2016 Urban Studies Forum: Alternative Visions of Livability Choices, Costs and Consequences

February 25, 2016 8:30am to 1:30pm William W. Philip Hall 1918 Pacific Avenue Tacoma Washington 98402

For a city or a suburb to be livable, we assume certain characteristics and experiences. What are these and how do we define a livable place? Is there an agreement on what defines livability? The 2016 Urban Studies Forum will focus on these questions and what they might mean to the South Sound. In two separate panel discussions, we...

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New! Urban Map Gallery

New! Urban Map Gallery

​We’ve created a new urban map gallery to explore how other people and organizations are studying and visualizing data. The gallery features seven cities facing different social, economic, and geographic issues. This curation is not meant to be an exhaustive list, but rather provide insight and inspiration. Maps included track everything from sound to subway pathogens.

Check it out, it’s fun!

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