September Recap - News, Big Data, and Monthly Hightlights

September Recap - News, Big Data, and Monthly Hightlights

Cropped image from Flickr user Eric Fischer under CC 2.0.

September is nearly gone, but this was not a very sleepy month. The University of Washington has started the new school year and the past month has seen some tremendous developments for urban thinking and the City of Seattle.

KQED published a piece about urban heat islands and how changes in landcover from hard-scapes and lawns to gardens and natural plantings would yield cumulative cooling effects—but in a surprising way, where day...

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Landscaping for Drought Could Make Warm Nights Cooler

Landscaping for Drought Could Make Warm Nights Cooler

Wikimedia Commons and PSA1966 under CC BY-SA4.0

As drought-stricken residents of Los Angeles’s hottest neighborhoods replace thirsty lawns with native plants, pavers and bare soil, new research has shown how their local climates could begin tipping back in the direction of their desert-like origins.

Nighttime lows help people recover daily even as heat waves persist.

In a region beset this year by drought and powerful heat waves, the widespread adoption of drought-proof landscaping is expected to...

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Weekly Recap 11/16-11/20

Weekly Recap 11/16-11/20
​UW releases new report on climate change in the Puget Sound. View story on UW Today > Students from the UW School of Public Health tackle heath care challenges facing people without homes. Video on King 5 News > UW College of the Environment posted last week’s lecture from John Vidale, “A tale of three Seattle temblors: One big, one deep, and one direct hit” . View Dr. Vidale’s Lecture Here > UW...

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