New Tech Could Restore Some Quiet To Noisy Oceans

New Tech Could Restore Some Quiet To Noisy Oceans

Jill Fine & Wikimedia Commons

Forty feet below the surface of Puget Sound, a marbled murrelet dives for its catch. The water is cold, dark — and incredibly noisy. A ping-ping-ping emanates from the shore over second-long intervals and continues on for the next several hours, sending a series of pressure waves through the ocean. For the endangered bird, these sounds could result in anything from a disturbing annoyance to internal injuries or even death.

The pings...

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Research Spotlight: An Octopus’ Garden in the Urban Underwater Environment

Research Spotlight: An Octopus’ Garden in the Urban Underwater Environment
Research Spotlight: An Octopus’ Garden in the Urban Underwater Environment

Eliza is a Ph.D. candidate in the UW Department of Biology and a graduate fellow in the IGERT Program on Ocean Change. She studies urban marine ecosystems under the guidance of Dr. Ken Sebens. If you like what you read below, check out her blog at www.urbanmarineecology.org.

In 1955, Columbia Pictures released the thriller It Came From Beneath The Sea, in which an enormous octopus begins terrorizing the good citizens...

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Group at UW shows how to account for nature’s benefits in decisions

Group at UW shows how to account for nature’s benefits in decisions

The Natural Capital Project is working to understand how people value nature and the services it provides, to better inform decision makers and promote smarter decisions for both the planet and the economy. The project began from a partnership between Stanford University and the University of Minnesota following the UN’s Millennium Ecosystem Assessment.

The Organization’s UW office is lead by Anne Guerry, chief strategy officer and lead scientist, and managing...

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