Seismic Neglect: Buildings and Earthquakes

Seismic Neglect: Buildings and Earthquakes

Kevin Galvin, FEMA News Photo Library

Seismic Neglect | In the first part of a continuing series, The Seattle Times examined officials’ neglect of the most vulnerable kind of building: old, brick structures called unreinforced masonry. Here are answers to some common questions about those buildings.

The Northwest is threatened by earthquakes far more destructive than anything Washington state has experienced in modern times, a danger lawmakers have largely disregarded. In the first part of a continuing series, The Seattle Times...

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Office Hours with Britton Shephard

Office Hours with Britton Shephard

Britton Shephard & Hailey Mackay

Britton Shepard is a Masters student in Landscape Architecture at the University of Washington, and will be graduating this June. He is currently wrapping up his thesis project, Site 1121: Field Notes, a public site exhibition of an abandoned lot that explored the history and identity of a landscape in an urban setting. The week-long installation took place in the U District at 1121 NE 45th St. March 21- 25, 2016, with support from the Washington State Employee’s...

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Get Out of Jail Now, Now Pay Up: Your Fines are Waiting

Get Out of Jail Now, Now Pay Up: Your Fines are Waiting

Wikimedia Commons & Bob Jagendorf

When you’re convicted of a crime in America, it’s not just prison time you may face—there are fines, fees, and other cash penalties, too. And when you get out, they’ll be waiting. Plus interest.

The plight of “Kathie” symbolizes everything that’s wrong with this system, one that heaps a debt burden onto ex-convicts who don’t have the means to pay. Kathie (a pseudonym) was a 4...

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New Project to Shine Light on Dark Places Around UW campus

New Project to Shine Light on Dark Places Around UW campus

UW Today & The Integrated Design Lab

Where do you walk on campus after dark, and which areas could benefit from better lighting?

An interdisciplinary team of students, faculty and staff together with lighting design experts is asking the UW community those questions as part of a new plan to improve the efficiency and sustainability of outdoor lighting around the Seattle campus. The team’s survey to campus includes an interactive map for respondents to place markers and comments...

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Seattle’s ‘Diverse’ Neighborhoods Are Surprisingly Segregated

Seattle’s ‘Diverse’ Neighborhoods Are Surprisingly Segregated

Tim Thomas and KUOW

Seattleites know they live in a racially segregated city.

White people live north; black people and Asians live south.

But there are a handful of neighborhoods that have become increasingly integrated in recent years – namely, Columbia City and the Central District.

But University of Washington sociology doctoral students found that those neighborhoods may not be so diverse when you analyze the area block by block. Tim Thomas,...

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Reading List for Patricia Romero Lankao Visit 5/11

Reading List for Patricia Romero Lankao Visit 5/11

Courtesy of Flickr User Ali Almazawi

In anticipation of Patricia Romero Lankao’s visit we thought you might enjoy these pieces to get a feel for her research and thinking.

Water in Mexico City: What Will Climate Change Bring to Its History of Water-Related Hazards and Vulnerabilities?—This research paper delves into the history and evolution of water related risks and crises in Mexico City in order to gain insight to socio-environmental challenges as a result of...

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Urban Planning and PhD Program Addresses ‘The Future City’ (5/5)

Urban Planning and PhD Program Addresses ‘The Future City’ (5/5)

Courtesy Arup and John Robertson Architects

What kinds of cities shall we live in, and how can urban planners help make them a reality? What possible future scenarios lie ahead, and how will big data and new technologies affect science and decision-making in urban design?

The University of Washington Graduate School’s Interdisciplinary PhD Program in Urban Design and Planning’s annual symposium for 2016 will tackle such questions with panel discussions featuring faculty, industry professionals and a pair...

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Quick Recap: A Busy April!

Quick Recap: A Busy April!

Designed by Urban@UW, images courtesy of UW, Wikimedia, Flickr, African Centre for Cities

April saw a lot of wonderful developments here at the University of Washington, here’s a quick recap:

Our first Office Hours interview with John Vidale (more coming of these soon!) UW researchers continued to explore the effects of a $15/hr minimum wage. PBS premiered their 10 Parks that Changed America program featuring our own Thaisa Way and Iain Robertson of UW Edgar Pieterse delivered a fantastic talk about African urbanism! Joe Lott launched...

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Examing Urban Inequality, Vulnerability and Risk to Enhance Resilience with Dr. Lankao (5/11)

Examing Urban Inequality, Vulnerability and Risk to Enhance Resilience with Dr. Lankao (5/11)

Wikimedia Commons - Fidel Gonzalez

Dr. Patricia Romero Lankao / May 11th / 5:00-6:30pm / CMU 102

With the coming impacts of climate change, including sea level rise, extreme weather events, and drastic changes in water availability, it can be expected that prosperous, well-governed cities can generally adapt, at least for the next few decades – assuming global efforts at mitigation successfully halt and then reverse global emissions of greenhouse gases. But most of the world’s urban population lives...

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Office Hours With John Vidale, UW Seismologist

Office Hours With John Vidale, UW Seismologist

Courtesy John Vidale and the UW Earth and Space Sciences Department

John Vidale is a professor at the University of Washington in the Earth & Space Sciences Department specializing in seismology, particularly around the Cascadia Fault Zone and while there’s been a lot of talk (read: worry and fear) about the Cascadia Subduction Zone this geologist isn’t panicking. John talks to us about the problem of long odds, the futility of speeding along the Viaduct, and the challenges of implementing earthquake warning...

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Early Analysis of Seattle’s $15 Wage Law: Effect on Prices Minimal One Year After Implementation

Early Analysis of Seattle’s $15 Wage Law: Effect on Prices Minimal One Year After Implementation

Tom Sparks / Flickr

Most Seattle employers surveyed in a University of Washington-led study said in 2015 that they expected to raise prices on goods and services to compensate for the city’s move to a $15 per hour minimum wage.

But a year after the law’s April 2015 implementation, the study indicates such increases don’t seem to be happening.

The interdisciplinary Seattle Minimum Wage Study team, centered in the Evans School for Public Policy ...

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Rethinking Data Science for the Social Sciences: Urban Sociology

Rethinking Data Science for the Social Sciences: Urban Sociology

Courtesy Wikimedia Commons

On Wednesday, May 4th, an interdisciplinary panel will explore the intersections of data and cities. Rethinking Data Science for the Social Sciences: Urban Sociology will look at how the availability of new forms of data has transformed the way researchers may approach their work across disciplines. This panel will bring together experts from data science and the social sciences who are utilizing new and exciting forms of data to discuss the opportunities and challenges...

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10 Parks that Changed America Premieres Tonight on PBS (KCTS9)

10 Parks that Changed America Premieres Tonight on PBS (KCTS9)

Courtest Joe Wolf, Flickr

Tune into KCTS9 at 8:00pm to see the premier of 10 Parks that Changed America. Two of Seattle’s great parks made the list for this interesting look at the influence parks and public spaces have had on America. A packed house at Architecture Hall saw a preview a few weeks ago and it’s great! Our very own Thaisa Way along with fellow UW Landscape Architecture department professor Iain Robertson are both featured!

...

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One Year On, Seattle Explores Impact Of $15 Minimum Wage Law

One Year On, Seattle Explores Impact Of $15 Minimum Wage Law

Wikimedia Commons

NPR’s Ari Shapiro talks with University of Washington Professor Jacob Vigdor about the state of the minimum wage in Seattle, as California and New York move to lift their minimum wages to $15.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Now, let’s dig deeper into what has happened in Seattle, one of the first big cities to pass that $15 minimum wage law. That happened in 2014. Joining us now is Jacob Vigdor, a University...

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Reading List for Edgar Pieterse Visit 4/12

Reading List for Edgar Pieterse Visit 4/12

Portrait Courtesy of African Centre for Cities

In anticipation of Edgar Pieterse’s visit we thought you might enjoy a video lecture and in-depth examination to get a feel for Pieterse’s research and thinking.

How can we transcend slum urbanism in Africa? – Edgar Pieterse, University of Cape Town - This short video delivered by Edgar Pieterse and UN-Habitat offers a very accessible overview of African urbanism and places these ideas in the context of...

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